Emergency Dialing Service 911 or E911

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The VoIP Service does not function or connect the same way as traditional copper, fiber or wireline Communications support for traditional 911 or E911 access to emergency services. The certain features of “E911″ may not be available in all areas or technically feasible via this Service and, depending on the circumstances, an End User may not be connected to a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP)/emergency operator or if connected, the PSAP/emergency operator may not have information on an End User’s address.

The RNK may provide Emergency Services via different methods in different areas, and that RNK does not warranty or guarantee the availability of any particular method of Emergency Services provision. In some instances, the Emergency Services provisioning method may require that the Emergency Services caller be able to communicate their location, telephone number, or identity verbally to the Emergency Services call taker. Additionally, Customer understands that the Emergency Services call taker may not have the ability to call back an End User who is disconnected for any reason from an Emergency Services Call. Additionally, you acknowledge and understand that 911/E911 services may currently be unavailable in the geographic location in which you plan to use the service. You understand and agree that prior to Service activation; you must familiarize yourself with, and acknowledge, the limitations of 911/E911 dialing associated with the Service through an online web-based activation process that can be accessed at https://keensystems.eu.

911 Requires Account Activation: You acknowledge and understand that 911 dialing, when available, does not function unless you have successfully activated your Account and provided a proper Registered Location, i.e., the address where emergency personnel will respond in the event you dial 911. You acknowledge and understand that you will not be able to access 911 emergency services from your voip service unless it is available in your location and until you have completed the e911/911 acknowledgement process and have activated your service.

To overcome the lack of E911 (E100 in Europe), it is recommended that each factory or workplace should have at least one non-VoIP line in each office for emergency call as it phases out its PBXes exchanges keeping mind that all emergency service calls cannot be made over the VoIP.

Prior to activating a new customer’s service, VoIP providers must obtain the street address where the service will be used, so that emergency services will have the best chance to locate the customer in the event of a 911 call.

Enhanced 911 or E911 service is a North American telephone network (NANP) feature of the 911 emergency-calling system that automatically associates a physical address with the calling party’s telephone number as required by the Wireless Communications and Public Safety Act of 1999. More specifically, manufacturers, such as recent entry VoIP vendor Zultys Technologies, are fine-tuning products like its MX250 to mitigate the 911 situation.

Enhanced 911 is reported to be currently deployed in most metropolitan areas in the United States and Canada. Outside the United States this type of facility is often called ‘caller location’, though its implementation is dependent on how the telephone network processes emergency calls.

While users typically use Skype from laptops or from several computers. It is common for them to log into their Skype accounts from home, work, hotel rooms, airports, internet cafes, and anywhere else they have access to a computer and a broadband connection. As a consequence it seems to be self evident that any user-reported location information, even if initially correct, will only at best accurately describe a user’s location some of the time. At worst, and not infrequently the user-given address could be error so much so that the real location may be in a different continent.

In this circumstance, many VoIP suppliers consider themselves unable to transmit location and callback information, as to provide incorrect data may be worse than the provision of none at all. A VoIP service provider supplied call to the emergency services would run a serious risk of being routed to the wrong public response service location, and would contain unreliable information once connected. Furthermore, to increase the burden on the emergency response services with improperly routed VoIP service provider sourced calls and then supply unreliable information would be a very unfortunate outcome, to be avoided above all.

The advice given at present by most VoIP providers is that their services should not be used as a telephone replacement service and cannot be used for emergency dialing. All those who in turn provide VoIP telecoms through their own systems, such as within businesses, hotels etc. should also give the same warning, and an emergency line enabled alternative service should be made available and known to all that may need to use it.